Engaging and Articulating ‘Race’: Historical Encounters with Race and Racialization

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Adele Perry, Associate Professor, University of Manitoba, Canada Research
Chair in Western Canadian Social History

racial-classiications

It has become commonly understood that ‘race’ is socially constructed—its meaning in flux over time, space and place. Yet, scholars still grapple with the intricacies that make defining and fully understanding ‘race’ so elusive. This conference is intended to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present current work on historical processes of ‘race’, racialization, and ethnicization. We encourage submissions that challenge accepted definitions of what constitutes ‘race’ and how it operates through time and across geographic space. How have notions of ‘race’ been constructed, maintained, and dismantled through actual social interactions? In different times and places, how can ‘race’ and racialization be seen as operating relationally? How have particular social actors drawn upon existing notions of ‘race’ and reconfigured these to suit their immediate needs in relation to a particular social situation, or relationships with other social actors? To what extent and in what ways have people been trapped in or been able to escape the racial thinking of their moment?

The
History Department at the University of Victoria invites graduate students from any discipline to submit paper proposals that consider ‘race’ and racialization from an historical perspective, for presentation at Engaging and Articulating ‘Race’: Historical Encounters with Race and Racialization. The intention of this Graduate Student Symposium is to promote historically grounded research at the graduate level from both Canadian and international perspectives on the topic of ‘race’ and racialization. First-time presenters and upper-level undergraduates are welcome and encouraged to submit proposals.



Engaging and Articulating ‘Race’: Historical Encounters with Race and Racialization

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Adele Perry, Associate Professor, University of Manitoba, Canada Research
Chair in Western Canadian Social History

It has become commonly understood that ‘race’ is socially constructed—its meaning in flux over time, space and place. Yet, scholars still grapple with the intricacies that make defining and fully understanding ‘race’ so elusive. This conference is intended to provide graduate students with an opportunity to present current work on historical processes of ‘race’, racialization, and ethnicization. We encourage submissions that challenge accepted definitions of what constitutes ‘race’ and how it operates through time and across geographic space. How have notions of ‘race’ been constructed, maintained, and dismantled through actual social interactions? In different times and places, how can ‘race’ and racialization be seen as operating relationally? How have particular social actors drawn upon existing notions of ‘race’ and reconfigured these to suit their immediate needs in relation to a particular social situation, or relationships with other social actors? To what extent and in what ways have people been trapped in or been able to escape the racial thinking of their moment?

The History Department at the University of Victoria invites graduate students from any discipline to submit paper proposals that consider ‘race’ and racialization from an historical perspective, for presentation at Engaging and Articulating ‘Race’: Historical Encounters with Race and Racialization. The intention of this Graduate Student Symposium is to promote historically grounded research at the graduate level from both Canadian and international perspectives on the topic of ‘race’ and racialization. First-time presenters and upper-level undergraduates are welcome and encouraged to submit proposals.